New Books

Fakes!?

Hoaxes, Counterfeits and Deception in Early Modern Science

Ed. by  Marco Beretta and Maria Conforti

June 30, 2014
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Objects of Chemical Inquiry

ed. by Ursula Klein and Carsten Reinhardt

August 20, 2013

Leading historians of chemistry present fascinating case studies illuminating broad array of objects of inquiry in modern chemistry, from the eighteenth century until today. These include everyday items such as glass as well as invisible chemical entities, accessible only through networks of experimentation and theory. *Distribution outside The Americas  by Koninklijke Brill N.V., Leiden, The Netherlands, ISBN 978-90-04-27496-9

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The Nobel Prizes

Les Prix Nobel
2012

Karl Grandin, editor

May 2, 2014

The Nobel Prizes is the official yearbook of the Nobel Foundation. This edition provides extensive information about the 2012 Laureates: their Nobel and Prize Lectures and their autobiographies, as well as presentation speeches and background about the Nobel festivities. *Also for sale at the Nobel Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.

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Caroline Herschel: Priestess of the New Heavens

Michael Hoskin

August 20, 2013

Michael Hoskin, acclaimed historian of science and founding editor of The Journal for the History of Astronomy, provides an in depth look at the remarkable life and times of the pioneering female scientist/astronomer; her many trials and eventual triumph during a fascinating moment in history.   See Clothbound Library Edition

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A Melancholy Scene of Devastation

The Public Response to the 1793 Philadelphia Yellow Fever Epidemic

J. Worth Estes & Billy G. Smith, eds.

May 13, 2012

In modern America, where the triumph over disease is often taken for granted and yellow fever has ceased to be a menace, it is difficult to appreciate the fear once engendered by this disease. The 1793 Philadelphia yellow fever epidemic was no mere round of sickness but a major public health emergency that paralyzed city […]

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Surgery of the Soul

Reflections on a Curious Career

Joseph E. Murray, M.D.

July 9, 2012

This remarkable book is the autobiography of one of the 20th century’s most honored surgeons, Joseph E. Murray, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1990. In it, Dr. Murray describes his role in breakthrough research in human organ transplantation and his pioneering advances in surgical techniques to correct deformities of the […]

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Reason, Experiment, and Mysticism in the Scientific Revolution

M. L. Righini Bonelli and William R. Shea, eds.

October 18, 2012

Published in 1975 and often cited as a significant contribution to the establishment of history of science as a discipline within the academic community, this paperback reprint of a long out of print title, including a brief preface by the surviving editor, reaffirms many of its primary scholarly objectives while commemorating the 40th anniversary of […]

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Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius

or a Sidereal Message

Translated from the Latin by William R. Shea
Introduction and notes by William R. Shea and Tiziana Bascelli

May 13, 2012

An instrument can change the world and compel us to rethink our place in the universe. The telescope did just this, but only when it was used by Galileo, whose eye was prepared to see new things and whose hand was able to depict what he saw. It was not only because Galileo was a […]

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The Persisting Osler IV

Selected Transactions of the American Osler Society, 2001—2010

edited by Jeremiah A. Barondess and Charles S. Bryan

May 13, 2012
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Hormones of Life

Endocrinology, the Pharmaceutical Industry, and the Dream of a Remedy for Sterility, 1930–1970

Christer Nordlund

May 13, 2012
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Changes in the Technological Landscape

Essays in the History of Science and Technology

Svante Lindqvist

May 13, 2012
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Science for Welfare and Warfare

Technology and State Initiative in Cold War Sweden

Per Lundin, Niklas Stenlås, and Johan Gribbe, editors

May 13, 2012
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The Brokered World

Go-Betweens and Global Intelligence, 1770–1820

Simon Schaffer, Lissa Roberts, Kapil Raj, James Delbourgo, editors

May 13, 2012
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Æmula Lauri

The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters, 1760 - 2010

Håkon With Andersen, Brita Brenna, Magne Njåstad, and Astrid Wale

May 13, 2012

Det Kongelige Norske VidenskabersSelskab—The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters—was established in 1760 in the city of Trondheim, Norway. This makes it among the oldest of its kind in the Nordic countries and the by far the oldest one in Norway. The present volume celebrates its 250th anniversary and is the first comprehensive study […]

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The Accademia del Cimento and its European Context

Marco Beretta, Antonio Clericuzio, and Lawrence M. Principe, editors

May 13, 2012

The Accademia del Cimento, organized in Florence under Medici patronage, devoted itself for ten years (1657-1667) to the experimental investigation of a broad range of scientific matters, and provided a model and inspiration for many subsequent scientific societies. Despite its crucial position in the history of science, the Cimento’s work and diverse membership has remained […]

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The Alchemy of Glass

Counterfeit, Imitation, and Transmutation in Ancient Glassmaking

Marco Beretta

May 13, 2012

Recipient of the Paul-Bunge-Prize for 2013

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From the Pulpit of Saint James School:

Volume Two • 2002 - 2009
Further Thoughts of a Priest Headmaster

D. Stuart Dunnan

May 13, 2012
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The Migration of Ideas

Roberto Scazzieri and Raffaella Simili, Editors

May 13, 2012

Ideas migrate across time and space, sometimes in conjunction with the migration of people and sometimes independently of it. The migration of ideas from one context to another is a central aspect of communication among scholars and scientists. It is one of the most important features of cultural, intellectual and scientific history. It is also […]

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Aurora Torealis

Studies in the History of Science and Ideas in Honor of Tore Frängsmyr

Marco Beretta, Karl Grandin, and Svante Lindqvist, editors

May 13, 2012

Contributors include: Tiziana Bascelli, Jean-François Battail, Marco Beretta, Janet Browne, Robert Darnton, Lorraine Daston, Paolo Galluzzi, Karl Grandin, John L. Heilbron, Daniel J. Kevles, Svante Lindqvist, Thorsten Nybom, Mary Jo Nye, Sheldon Rothblatt, Nicolaas A. Rupke, William R. Shea, H. Otto Sibum, and Sven Widmalm.

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The Papers of Joseph Henry: Volume 12

CUMULATIVE INDEX

Compiled by: Kathleen W. Dorman
Assisted by: Sarah J. Shoenfeld

May 13, 2012

Winner of the 2007 Ferguson Prize. All other volumes in the series are still available. Click here for contents, prices and description information. Additional information is available from The Joseph Henry Papers Project: http://www.siarchives.si.edu/history/jhp/jhenry.html

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Alfred Nobel: Networks of Innovation

(Archives of the Nobel Museum 10)

Ulf Larsson

May 13, 2012
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Andreas Libavius and the Transformation of Alchemy

Separating Chemical Cultures with Polemical Fire

Bruce T. Moran

May 13, 2012
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Chymists and Chymistry

Studies in the History of Alchemy and Early Modern Chemistry

Lawrence M. Principe, Editor

May 13, 2012

Chymistry (that is, alchemy and early chemistry) is currently receiving an unprecedented amount of scholarly attention. Long-held misunderstandings are being replaced by a wealth of fresh perspectives and discoveries, as scholars progressively reveal alchemy’s crucial place in early modern culture and its contributions to early modern science. This volume brings together the most recent work […]

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The Papers of Joseph Henry: Volume 11

January 1866—May 1878, The Smithsonian Years

Editor: Marc Rothenberg
Associate Editor: Kathleen W. Dorman
Assistant Editor: Frank R. Millikan
Research Assistant: Deborah Y. Jeffries
Research Assistant: Sarah Shoenfeld

May 13, 2012

In this final volume of The Papers of Joseph Henry, Henry emerges as the unrivaled leader of American science and the nation’s foremost proponent of funding for basic scientific research. Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution since its founding in 1846, Henry guides its recovery from the Civil War while reshaping it by reducing or eliminating programs […]

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Linnaeus in Italy

The Spread of a Revolution in Science

Marco Beretta and Alessandro Tosi, editors

May 13, 2012

Digital Library of Italian editions of Linnaeus Uppsala Studies in History of Science, Volume 34

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Extremes

Oceanography’s Adventures at the Poles

Keith R. Benson and Helen M. Rozwadowski, editors

May 13, 2012
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Shifting and Rearranging

Physical Methods and the Transformation of Modern Chemistry

Carsten Reinhardt

 

May 13, 2012

In the second half of the twentieth century, chemistry underwent a profound transformation. Its object of examination, the chemical substance, was transmuted into abstract structure; its most important method, the chemical reaction, was supplemented by physical methods; and its practitioner, the chemist, was partially displaced by technical instruments. At the center of this transformation were […]

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The Physicians’ Crusade Against Abortion

Frederick N. Dyer

May 13, 2012

Read Chapter 22 See also Champion of Women and the Unborn

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Narrating the Arctic

A Cultural History of Nordic Scientific Practice

Michael Bravo and Sverker Sörlin, eds.

November 12, 2012
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Oliver Wendell Holmes (PB)

Physician and Man of Letters

Scott H. Podolsky and Charles S. Bryan, Editors

May 13, 2012

Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809–1894) spent parts of the nineteenth century as America’s best-known physician and best-selling author. Sir William Osler praised him as “the most successful combination which the world has ever seen, of the physician and man of letters.” Henry James, Sr., called him “intellectually the most alive man I ever knew.” Today, he […]

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